EVERY CHILD
HAS A PASSISON


EVERY CHILD
HAS A PASSISON


EVERY CHILD
HAS A PASSISON


Carlos Lamela. Architect


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Nowadays we’ve all seen that it’s practically a shopping centre, where you sometimes catch a plane. I’m joking of course, but the economic factor now has a major influence on the way an airport is built.
Keywords: Architecture, civil engineering
Project Partner


Danosa is a company specialized in integral solutions for sustainable construction and improvement of habitability.
Credits

Project by
Asensio Comunicació Visual

A creative agency based in Barcelona available for work worldwide. Specialise in brand strategy, concept development, content marketing and visual storytelling in transmedia projects.
Together with Carlos Lamela, owner and executive president of Estudio Lamela, we talk about his disruptive approach to architecture.

Carlos Lamela is a Spanish architect. Superior architect by the Technical School of Architecture of Madrid in 1981 and 'designer' by the UIA of Florence (Italy) in 1984. His entire professional career has been spent at the architecture firm of Estudio Lamela, founded by his late father, Antonio Lamela, in 1954. Works carried out by the company under his guidance, particularly the large public facilities such as airports and soccer stadiums, has earned international awards and recognition by critics.

He is former president of the Spanish chapter of the Urban Land Institute.
Carlos Lamera Insight
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Every child has a passion
Every child has a passion for planes. It’s something that comes from your childhood. The first image I have of a plane is in the Retiro park in Madrid. I heard a noise and saw a plane pass overhead. I remember reaching out my hand to try and catch it.
New economic hubs
In the past an airport was just a place where people caught planes. Nowadays we’ve all seen that it’s practically a shopping centre, where you sometimes catch a plane. I’m joking of course, but the economic factor now has a major influence on the way an airport is built. Airports are no longer just places where you can travel the world, but one of the most important economic hubs of a city.
Largest building companies
Spanish developers dominate the world today. And everyone is astonished how a country, which isn’t in the first league, which is behind the United States, Germany, the United Kingdom, France, and even Italy, has the largest construction companies in the world, and the largest concession holders. So architecture has always been important in our country. We’ve always had good architects, good architecture schools, but because this sector grew so much it was the first to feel the pinch when the recession hit.
Renewed optimism
Now it seems that the cycle has changed, we’re in a cycle that has begun with renewed optimism. The problem is that there are lots of architects and even though there’s more work now, we need to create space for all of us. This means architects have had to explore new frontiers, other countries to work in. Luckily we did the groundwork years ago and we began to expand before the recession. We’ve been working abroad for more than 15 years, with offices in Poland, Mexico and Qatar.
Technical challenges
Height is something that both architecture and the human condition itself finds attractive. A tall building is technically challenging, and it also has a gracefulness that makes it very attractive. One project we’re working at the moment is a towerblock in Brussels which is being completely refurbished. It’s 130 metres high with more than thirty floors. We’re also involved in the Edificio España project with Foster, which is going to be another tall building. In Qatar we’re currently working on a skyscraper that’s 160 meters high. This is a step up for us as it’s forty floors and it’s a project that I’m very pleased to be involved in.
Sustainability. An inescapable parameter
Sustainable architecture has always existed. What’s different now is that it’s is an inescapable parameter. It’s become a fundamental aspect that all architects have to consider. Legislation is much stricter these days, and not only in the world of architecture. The matter of energy efficiency is a reality in the world of cars. How much did cars consume thirty years ago, and how much do they consume now? A third of what they did. This is because: first, the market demands it; second, because regulations demand it; and third, because society now sees it as something normal. These days car engines normally stop automatically when you get to a traffic light. This isn’t to decrease consumption but so as not to pollute.
New frontiers
To continue exploring all possible technical avenues is a good thing, in my opinion. Insulation of any type, be it against the water or noise, is very important. Danosa can help make progress in this field, contributing to society, and to the sector - not just architects, but all users of architecture.
Contact
Estudio Lamela - Arquitectos
www.lamela.com
Bio
Carlos Lamela. Owner and executive president of Estudio Lamela

Carlos Lamela is a Spanish architect. Superior architect by the Technical School of Architecture of Madrid in 1981 and 'designer' by the UIA of Florence (Italy) in 1984. His entire professional career has been spent at the architecture firm of Estudio Lamela, founded by his late father, Antonio Lamela, in 1954. Works carried out by the company under his guidance, particularly the large public facilities such as airports and soccer stadiums, has earned international awards and recognition by critics.

He is former president of the Spanish chapter of the Urban Land Institute.
About Architecture Dialogues
Our vision is to create a global community to generate knowledge, encourage innovation and promote business in building sector. A disruptive approaching to the future of the architecture.
The reality is that architecture refuses to stagnate, despite the heated appeals for it to do so, and its history reveals an unceasing trajectory of transformation. Changing material technologies, construction methods, environmental conditions, and cultural forces exert profound influences on the art of building. When architects and builders have sought to harness these currents in thoughtful, open-minded ways, they have produced some of our most memorable works.
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